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excdus:

These iron islands appear in the middle of the salt lake Arizaro in Argentina, their colors are the result of oxidation across millions of years. 
Stéphane San Quirce

excdus:

These iron islands appear in the middle of the salt lake Arizaro in Argentina, their colors are the result of oxidation across millions of years. 

Stéphane San Quirce


excdus:

These iron islands appear in the middle of the salt lake Arizaro in Argentina, their colors are the result of oxidation across millions of years. 

Stéphane San Quirce

If I see three or four young black men walking down the street, I have to stop them and check their names. I want them to be afraid every time they see the police that they might get arrested.

Chief Russell Mills to the LA Times after shooting and killing black 89-year-old great grandfather Shawn Monroe at a barbecue unprovoked. Today, he walks free with no charges, despite numerous witnesses and his own admission that he enjoys terrorizing black people.

Tell me again why Black people should be okay with police when they have, since the history of our being kidnapped to this fucking country, have not EVER been about protecting us, but about terrorizing us?

Police are NOT for Black people’s safety. They are about torturing us, terrorizing us and killing us. Period. There is no safety with police. There is no peace keeping with police. They have ALWAYS been a terror to the Black community and I am tired of this fact being pushed to the wayside.

(via sourcedumal)

And Ray Kelly, when he was Commissioner in NYC said the same thing.
Arpaio has said the same thing.

This is a ROUTINE assertion that the point of the police is to be an agent of state terror. And that such terror should be all but exclusively focused on Black and Brown bodies.

(via note-a-bear)

"The ghost of bull conner" ~ MHP

(via jcoleknowsbest)

This statement doesn’t surprise me, but please note how boldly and comfortably he came out of his face to say this.

(via sapphrikah)

mazzystardust:

Chuyên Tíhn Cûa Biên | Yue Ning by Jumbo Tsui

mazzystardust:

Chuyên Tíhn Cûa Biên | Yue Ning by Jumbo Tsui


mazzystardust:

Chuyên Tíhn Cûa Biên | Yue Ning by Jumbo Tsui

floozys:

i don’t care about straight girls who are afraid to cut their hair short in case they get called lesbians, i care about the fact that lesbians are being used as fucking insults 

A racist woman is not a feminist; she doesn’t care about helping women, just the women who look like her and can buy the same things she can.

A transphobic woman is not a feminist; she is overly concerned with policing the bodies and expressions of others.

A woman against reproductive rights — to use bell hook’s own example, and an issue close to your heart — is not a feminist; she prioritizes her dogma or her disgust over the bodies of others.

An ableist woman is not a feminist; she holds some Platonic ideal of what a physically or mentally “whole” person should be and tries to force the world to fit inside it.

An Open Letter to Caitlin Moran by Nyux

(via black—lamb)

These women can vote, teach, command, program, draw, read to their hearts’s content, because of advances made by feminisms. That can’t be denied if you’re being at all intellectually honest. Feminisms have helped them a lot in their life and they would not be where they are without the work of many activists before them. But they themselves are not feminists. Feminisms are not compatible with every single ideology out there.

(via clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead)

avocavo:

stunningpicture:

Pulled a layer of ice off a leaf

i thought u found a fairy wing omg

avocavo:

stunningpicture:

Pulled a layer of ice off a leaf

i thought u found a fairy wing omg


avocavo:

stunningpicture:

Pulled a layer of ice off a leaf

i thought u found a fairy wing omg

danipanteez:

it’s shark week yo.

danipanteez:

it’s shark week yo.


danipanteez:

it’s shark week yo.

thewriterscaravan:

If I may, I would at this point urge young writers not to be too much concerned with the vagaries of the marketplace. Not everyone can make a first-rate living as a writer, but a writer who is serious and responsible about his work, and life, will probably find a way to earn a decent living, if he or she writes well. A good writer will be strengthened by his good writing at a time, let us say, of the resurgence of ignorance in our culture. I think I have been saying that the writer must never compromise with what is best in him in a world defined as free.

Bernard Malamud II Address at Bennington College (30 October 1984) as published in “Reflections of a Writer: Long Work, Short Life” in The New York Times (20 March 1988); also in Talking Horse : Bernard Malamud on Life and Work (1996) edited by Alan Cheuse and ‎Nicholas Delbanco, p. 35